Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmaceutics & Novel Drug Delivery Systems London, UK.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Valery A. Petrenko photo
Biography:

Valery A. Petrenko, Professor in the Department of Pathobiology at Auburn University; graduated from Moscow State University, U.S.S.R (1972); received PhD and D.Sc. degrees in chemistry from the Zelinski Institute of Organic Chemistry (1976) and Moscow State University, U.S.S.R (1988), Honor Ranks of Senior Scientist in Bioorganic Chemistry (1984) and Professor in Molecular Biology (1992) from the Supreme Attestation Committee of the U.S.S.R. In 1977 he moved to Novosibirsk and worked as Junior and Senior Scientist (1977-1982), Laboratory Head (1982-1985), Associate Director for Research (1985-1989), Director of Institute, Vice President for Research and Professor (1989-1993) in Scientific Association Vector (Novosibirsk, Russia). In 1993 he joined the faculty of University of Missouri-Columbia as Visiting Professor and Research Professor, and in 2000 - Auburn University as Professor (2001). Dr. Petrenko established a research program focused on development of diagnostic and therapeutic probes using phage display and phage nanobiotechnology. Dr. Petrenko is recipient (PI) of grants from the Army Research Office, the National Institute of Health, Calvert Research, LLC, and Auburn University, and serves as Co-PI in several collaborative grants. He is recipient of the Pfizer Animal Health Awards for Research Excellence (2006, 2011), Auburn University's Scholarship Incentive Award (2014), Auburn President's Outstanding Collaborative Units Award in Pharmaceutical Engineering. He is member of National Academy of Inventors Chapter (2013), Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer (AURIC), National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (2009) and Phi Zeta Honor Society of Veterinary Medicine.

Abstract:

Development of precision medicines acting specifically at the site of disease has been a long sought goal for the last century. With the development of nanomedicines, significant progress towards this goal have been reached. In particular, active targeting has been proposed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicines. We developed several targeted nanomedicine systems that explore selected fusion phage proteins able to bind cancer cellular receptors, penetrate into the cells, accommodate at specific cellular compartments, and ultimately—produce expected cytotoxic effect of the phage protein-targeted nanomedicines. It was observed, however, that some nanomedicine-linked phage proteins specifically interacting with cancer cells in vitro don’t effect tumor growth in vivo. To increase in vivo effect of cancer nanomedicines, we modified the traditional concept of drug targeting and suggested a novel paradigm called ‘drug navigation’. It is based on the recently suggested targeting strategy that explores a combination of ligands able to overcome tumor-protecting biological barriers. We used our proprietary polyvalent peptide phage displayed ‘landscape’ libraries to select clones with specificity to various cancer types, which resulted in discovery of ‘promiscuous’ multi-motif phage proteins targeted to different cellular receptors. Studying homology of phage-displayed peptides using Next Generation Sequencing, we identified short linear motifs, which accumulate in the displayed peptides during different rounds of selection. These motifs serving as elementary binding units would provide the solid theoretical basis for rational design of molecular probes for studying and control of various biological systems, including tumor microenvironment. This discovery inspired us to propose the novel ‘addressed drug navigation’ concept, which relies on the use of ‘molecular self-navigating ligands’, selected from tissue-migrating polyvalent multi-motif landscape phage display libraries and accumulating ‘elementary binding units’ responsible for binding to different tissue cells (Fig.1). This novel ‘self-navigating’ drug delivery paradigm can be used as a theoretical basis in development of a novel generation of molecular imaging probes and medications for precise and personal medicine able to overcome biological and technical barriers that prevent their precise delivery.

Keynote Forum

Olivia Merkel

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit√§t M√ľnchen, Germany

Keynote: In-Situ Forming Gel Devices as Local Depot Therapeutic for Rheumatoide Arthritis

Time : TBA

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Olivia Merkel photo
Biography:

Olivia Merkel, is a Professor of Drug Delivery in the Department of Pharmacy at LMU Munich. From 2011 until 2016 she was an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics and an Associate Faculty Member of Oncology at Wayne State University and Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit. She became a Registered Pharmacist in 2005. In 2006, she received a MS in Pharmaceutics from Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, and a PhD in Pharmaceutics from Philipps-Universität Marburg in 2009. She received several awards, including an ERC Starting Grant, the Galenus Foundation Technology Award, the Wayne State College of Pharmacy Young Investigator Award, the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Science Young Pharmaceutical Investigator Award, an invitation to the Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting, the Carl-Wilhelm-Scheele-Award by the German Pharmaceutical Society (DPhG) and the award for the best PhD thesis at Philipps-Universität Marburg. Currently Prof. Merkel’s research focuses on targeted siRNA delivery in cancer and inflammatory diseases

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: More efficient anti-inflammatory therapies with reduced side effects are needed to treat Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic and disabling autoimmune condition that affects about 1% of the population in developed countries. Even though a multitude of cell types is involved, macrophages play a central role in the pathophysiology of RA. Locally implantable, targeted, macrophage-specific RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapies could therefore revolutionize RA therapy.

Methodology: Three-layered micelles (3LM) encapsulating nucleic acids were formed from triblock copolymers of PLLA-PEI-PLLA and PLLA-PEG-PLLA in a three-step procedure. Their structure and DNA entrapment in the core was determined by TEM. Hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potentials were measured by dynamic light scattering. DNA release in neutral and acidic pH was detected by modified SYBR Gold assays. For targeting of activated macrophages, folic acid (FA) was attached to the PEG-chain of a PLLA-PEG diblock affording PLLA-PEG-FA. Subsequently, 3LM were formed with PLLA-PEG-FA in the outer polymer shell. RAW264.7 cells were activated with LPS or left resting. Primary macrophages were isolated after in vivo activation. One day later, the cells were transfected with targeted and non-targeted 3LM, and GFP expression was quantified by flow cytometry. Thermoresponsive hydrogels were obtained by stereocomplexing 3LM which contain PLLA-PEG-PLLA in the outer core with PDLA-PEG-PDLA.

Conclusion & Significance: The core-corona structure and efficient DNA entrapment in the core were confirmed by TEM. Sizes were found to be less than 200 nm, and the encapsulation efficiency of DNA was optimized. 3LM were stable at neutral pH but released DNA in an acidic environment. 3LM were efficiently targeted to activated macrophages by blending PLLA-PEG-FA in the outer layer, while non-targeted micelles or PEI polyplexes were not efficiently taken up. Stereocomplexes of 3LM formed hydrogels above their phase transition temperature and released 3LM in acidic environment that efficiently transfected primary macrophages. 

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raid Alany photo
Biography:

Professor Raid Alany has over 25 years of international experience in pharmacy education, pharmaceutics and drug delivery research. His academic journey spans three continents, namely, Asia, Oceania and Europe. He received his PhD in drug delivery from the University of Otago, Dunedin New Zealand in 2001; was appointed as a Lecturer at the School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. He joined Kingston University London as Professor (Chair) of Pharmaceutics in January 2011 and was appointed as Research Director for the School of Pharmacy and Chemistry in December 2013. Raid is an author on over 200 scientific research publications (papers and abstracts), a book and seven book chapters. Professor Alany acts as Editor-in-Chief for Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, Section Editor for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology the official journal of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists; Chief Patron, Drug Development and Therapeutics, a publication of Organization of Pharmaceutical Unity with BioAllied Sciences (OPUBS). He serves on the Editorial Board of the following journals: Current Medical Research and Opinion, BioMed Research International, Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology, Current Drug Delivery, Pharmaceutics MDPI, and Drug Delivery Letters. He is the Immediate Past President of the New Zealand Chapter of the Controlled Release Society (NZCRS), Young Scientist Committee of the Controlled Release Society. Raid won several awards such as Microscopy New Zealand Young Scientists Award in 1999 The University of Auckland's Vice Chancellor's Early Career Research Excellence Award in 2003, the Controlled Release Society Veterinary Programme co-chair/ chair Distinguished Service Awards in 2008/2009 and the Spark Ideas Challenge, Uniservices Prize and Chiasma Prize in 2011. He consults for human and veterinary pharmaceutical companies in New Zealand and Singapore and is an inventor on several international patents.

Abstract:

Yet to be updated...

Keynote Forum

Sharareh Salar-Behzadi

Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH, Austria

Keynote: Lipid-based pharmaceutical formulations for patient-centric product development

Time : TBA

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sharareh Salar-Behzadi photo
Biography:

Sharareh Salar-Behzadi held her diploma in Pharmacy and PhD in Pharmaceutical Technology from University of Vienna. Her experience covers a broad range, including formulation and process development for production of solid dosage forms. She worked on several pharmaceutical manufacturing methods, among them solvent free hot-melt fluid-bed technology, wet fluid-bed granulation, roller compaction and methods for development of nano lipid carriers. She works at Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering (RCPE) GmbH since 2012 as Project Lead for scientific execution of projects for formulation engineering and development of particulate dosage forms. An important research focus is development of personalized-medicine with advanced stability, based on lipid-based excipients

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Lipids and lipid-based excipients are increasingly applied for development of patient-centric products. Their application in the pharmaceutical formulations covers a wide range, from taste-masking of oral dosage forms with modified; both immediate- and extended release profile to development of advanced nanoparticles for pulmonary or parenteral route of drug administration. Despite of this diversity in application, the drug release instability and the lack of mechanistic understanding of it still prevent the larger-scale application of lipidic excipients. This abstract provides a comprehensive overview on the complex solid state behavior of lipids and describes methods for monitoring this behavior for obtaining reliable and reproducible dosage forms.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Solid state behavior of lipids was studied as the response to the composition of formulation and to the critical parameters of the applied product manufacturing process, using X-ray diffraction, PLM and DSC. The applied processes were hot-melt coating for taste-masking and high pressure homogenization for preparation of nanosuspensions. Quality by Design (QbD) tools were used for monitoring the manufacturing process.

Findings: The instability of lipidic formulations can be addressed to both changes in molecular and supra-molecular levels. Changes in molecular level mainly contains polymorphic transformation and alteration in crystallite thickness, which can be monitored by careful selection of formulation composition and process parameters. Certain surfactants can be used as modifier, influencing the kinetic character of polymorphic transition of lipids. Process temperature can be monitored to control both crystallite growth kinetics and polymorphic transition. Understanding the microphase separation of formulations containing emulsifier is necessary and will help to improve the selection of pharmaceutical formulations.