Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmaceutics & Novel Drug Delivery Systems London, UK.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir Torchilin photo
Biography:

Vladimir P. Torchilin is a University Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. He graduated from the Moscow University with MS in Chemistry, and obtained there his Ph.D. and D.Sc. in Polymer Chemistry and Chemistry of Physiologically Active Compounds in 1971 and 1980, respectively. In 1991, Dr. Torchilin joined MGH/Harvard Medical School as the Head of Chemistry Program, Center for Imaging and Pharmaceutical Research, and Associate Professor of Radiology. He was the Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in 1998-2008. His research interests include liposomes, lipid-core micelles, biomedical polymers, drug delivery and targeting, pharmaceutical nanocarriers, experimental cancer immunology. He has published more than 350 original papers (which received more than 30,000 citations), more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 10 books.

Abstract:

Tumor therapy, especially in the case of multidrug resistant cancers, could be significantly enhanced by using siRNA down-regulating the production of proteins, which are involved in cancer cell resistance, such as Pgp or survivin. Even better response could be achieved is such siRNA could be delivered to tumors together with chemotherapeutic agent. This task is complicated by low stability of siRNA in biological surrounding. Thus, the delivery system should simultaneously protect siRNA from degradation. Additionally, these nanopreparations can be loaded into their lipidic core with poorly water soluble chemotherapeutic agents, such as paclitaxel or camptothecin. In experiments with cancer cell monolayers, cancer cell 3D spheroids, and in animals with implanted tumors, it was shown that such co-loaded preparations can significantly down-regulate target proteins in cancer cells, enhance drug activity, and reverse multidrug resistance. In order to specifically unload such nanopreparations inside tumors, we made them sensitive to local tumor-specific stimuli, such as lowered pH, hypoxia, or overexpressed certain enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteases. Using pH-, hypoxia-, or MMP2-sensitive bonds between different components of nanopreparations co-loaded with siRNA and drugs, we were able to make the systems specifically delivering biologically active agents in tumors, which resulted in significantly improved therapeutic response.

Keynote Forum

Andreas Bernkop-Schnürch

University of Innsbruck, Austria

Keynote: Oral Delivery of Biologics – Back to the Roots

Time : TBA

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andreas Bernkop-Schnürch photo
Biography:

Andreas Bernkop-Schnürch was educated in pharmacy (M.Sc.) and in microbiology and genetics (D.Sc.), University of Vienna, finishing his doctorate in 1994. In 2003 he was appointed to a chair in pharmaceutical technology at the University of Innsbruck. Since 2013 he heads the Institute of Pharmacy there. He invented and pioneered thiolated polymersthiomers – as a new generation of mucoadhesive polymers. Various medicines based on thiomers have already passed clinical trials and a first product will soon reach the global pharmaceutical market. He is the founder of several biotech companies and author of over 300 research articles and reviews. As of June 2016 his H-index is 61.

Abstract:

Within of the last decade biologics became the new, pioneering generation of therapeutics in treatment of numerous diseases. Their fast majority, however, is working through the parenteral route being less accepted and inconvenient, as the oral route for administration of biologics emerged to be problematic mostly due to the enzymatic barrier (I), the mucus gel barrier (II) and the absorption barrier (III) of the GI-tract. To overcome these barriers, a huge variety of strategies were established. Among these different strategies, lipophilic emulsifying delivery systems - having already been established more than 30 years ago for the oral administration of the peptide drug cyclosporine - are nowadays attracting more and more academic and industrial research groups, as the number of encouraging in vivo data and late stage clinical trials is strongly increasing. Among lipophilic emulsifying delivery systems in particular self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) are in focus of research and development. Despite their hydrophilic character biologics can be incorporated in the lipophilic phase of SEDDS via complexation with lipophilic excipients. Once emulsified in the GI-tract to lipid droplets in the size of 30-200 nm, SEDDS provide a protective effect towards a presystemic metabolism without taking the risk of any side effects. Furthermore, SEDDS exhibit comparatively high mucus permeating properties and can be taken up by epithelial cells in an efficient manner. Moreover, SEDDS can be produced very simply and cost effectively.  Because of these properties they seem to be a promising tool for oral administration of biologics.

Keynote Forum

Amiram Goldblum

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Keynote: Computational Discovery and Experimental Confirmation of TLR9 Receptor Antagonist Leads

Time : TBA

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amiram Goldblum photo
Biography:

Prof. (emeritus) Goldblum is Head of the Molecular Modeling and Drug Design and Discovery Unit at the Institute for Drug Research of the Hebrew University. Following a BSc in Chemistry and Physics and a MSc in QM studies of molecular spectra, Goldblum's PhD is in Organic Reaction Mechanisms (Hebrew University) followed by Postdoc studies of Quantum Biochemistry (Paris), and of QSAR and QM reaction mechanisms (California). Back at Hebrew U, Goldblum performed research of protein reactions and interactions using semiempirical QM and developed MNDO/H for dealing with H-bonding in relatively large molecular systems. Since 2000, Goldblum's group focuses on applications of his prize winning generic algorithm (ACS "emerging technologies", Washington D.C. 2000) for finding sets of best solutions in extremely complex combinatorial problems. ISE (Iterative Stochastic Elimination) has been applied to protein structure and conformations, to protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to molecular properties and to the discovery of drug candidates.

Abstract:

Toll-like receptors (TLR) are receptors of innate immunity that recognize Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns. They play a critical role in many pathological states, in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. TLR9 is a promising target for drug discovery, since it has been implicated in several pathologies, including defense against viral infections and psoriasis. Immune-modulators are promising molecules for therapeutic intervention in these indications. TLR9 is located in the endosome and activated by dsDNA with CpG motives encountered in microbial DNA.

Here we report on a combined approach to discover new TLR9 antagonists by computational chemistry and cell based assays. We used our in-house Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE) algorithm to create models that distinguish between TLR9 antagonists ("actives") and other molecules ("inactives"), based on molecular physico-chemical properties. Subsequent screening and scoring of a dataset of 1.8 million commercially available molecules led to the purchasing of top scored molecules, which were tested in a new cell based system based on human PRRs stably expressed in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. As described previously, this cell line shows a very low endogenous PRR-activity and contains a reporter gene which is selectively activated by the integrated human PRR enabling rapid screening of potential ligands. IC50 values of each of these top scored molecules were determined. Out of 60 molecules tested, 56 showed antagonistic activity. We discovered 21 new highly potential antagonists with IC50 values lower than 10 μM, with five of them having IC50 values under 1μM.

OMICS International Pharmaceutica 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arwyn T Jones photo
Biography:

Arwyn gained his PhD in protein biochemistry and crystallography at Birkbeck College, University of London. Then he undertook postdoctoral positions investigating endocytosis at the University of Liverpool and Harvard University, Boston USA.  In 2000 he was awarded a European Molecular Biology Organization fellowship to work at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg Germany, and continued at the EMBL when he was awarded an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Scholarship. He was appointed as Lecturer at the Cardiff School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Cardiff University in 2002 where he is now a Professor in Membrane Traffic and Drug Delivery.

Abstract:

Targeting a disease process inside a cell with biopharmaceuticals still represents a major challenge, not least in overcoming biological barriers such as those posed by the plasma membrane. Investment in this approach is justified when one considers the number individual intracellular targets now available to us as we continue to understand disease processes at the gene and protein level. This is true for many high-burden diseases including cancer, infectious diseases and inherited genetic defects such as cystic fibrosis. Our research is focused on studying endocytosis and specifically on designing methods to analyse individual endocytic pathways to characterise how drug delivery vectors and associated therapeutics gain access to cells. As vectors we have paid particular attention to natural ligands, cell penetrating peptides and antibodies, focusing on their capacity to not only interact with, and enter cells, but then on monitoring their intracellular traffic to reach a final destination. In this lecture I will describe work we have performed focusing on design and characterization of methods to study endocytosis of drug delivery vectors and on recent studies showing how internalisation of plasma membrane receptors can be significantly enhanced, and their normal endocytic routes modified to reach a desired intracellular location. Our involvement in a €30M FP7 Innovative Medicine Initiative (IMI-EFPIA) consortium (COMPACT www.compact-research.org/) will also be discussed. This represents a public-private collaboration between 14 European academic institutes and pharmaceutical companies aiming to improve the cellular delivery of biopharmaceuticals across major biological barriers of the intestine, lung, blood brain barrier and skin.